Tag Archives: Birmingham

We can do something about raw sewage and hookworm problem in Alabama

Catherine Coleman Flowers
Catherine Coleman Flowers

Today’s guest columnist is Catherine Coleman Flowers.

I was born in Birmingham and lived briefly in the city as it went through changes associated with the modern-day civil rights movement.

Eventually, my family moved to Lowndes County, which is where my father was born. Continue reading We can do something about raw sewage and hookworm problem in Alabama

Hopeful even though my sister was killed by white men

Lisa McNair

Today’s guest columnist is Lisa McNair.

My earliest memory is that white men who didn’t like her just because of the color of her skin, killed my sister.

My older sister, Denise McNair was the youngest of the four little girls killed by a bomb placed at 16th Street Baptist Church on September 15, 1963. Continue reading Hopeful even though my sister was killed by white men

Beacon of hope shines brighter than ever on Birmingham

Sanjay Singh

Today’s guest columnist is Sanjay Singh.

Dora and I moved to Birmingham in 1993. I was a newly minted Ph.D. from University of Georgia, where I met Dr. Khris McAllister, former Chair of the Management Department of Collat School of Business. He invited me for an interview in the fall of 1992. Continue reading Beacon of hope shines brighter than ever on Birmingham

Did it take a pandemic to ignite Birmingham’s economy?

Another gorgeous autumn day in Vestavia Hillls
Another gorgeous autumn day in Vestavia Hills

The pandemic hit and unexpectedly a few of my friends’ children moved back  home to Birmingham—some temporarily and some permanently.

Cities like New York were in lockdown leaving many unfortunate souls imprisoned in their apartments or condominiums. Continue reading Did it take a pandemic to ignite Birmingham’s economy?

85 year old attorney muses about his youth, slavery, white flight, and Alabama constitution

J. Mason Davis
J. Mason Davis
Today’s guest columnist is J. Mason Davis.

I entered high school in January of 1948, at A.H. Parker High School.  I would have entered in September 1948, but the Principal, Bertrand H. Hudson, felt that I had accomplished all I would during the first semester of the Eighth Grade.  Hence, a social promotion, then known as “skipping”. Continue reading 85 year old attorney muses about his youth, slavery, white flight, and Alabama constitution

Mountain Brook dad ponders white privilege and special needs son

Trotter Cobb
Trotter Cobb

Today’s guest columnist is Trotter Cobb.

I grew up in Tuscaloosa in the 1950s and 1960s. I see now I lived a life of white privilege. My father had a successful business; we lived comfortably and we had a Black maid and a Black yard man.

I grew up thinking of them as if they were members of our family and content to be in such roles. Continue reading Mountain Brook dad ponders white privilege and special needs son

Former B’ham police captain: Should we defund the police?

Teresa Thorne
Teresa Thorne

Today’s guest columnist is Teresa (T.K.) Thorne.

One of the confusing calls today is the one to “Defund the Police.” My thoughts on the subject are seasoned with a career in law enforcement, a master’s in social work, some research, and a couple of decades of contemplation. Continue reading Former B’ham police captain: Should we defund the police?

Discrimination exposed by brilliant Birmingham black artist

Celestia Morgan
Celestia Morgan

Today’s guest columnist is The Bill Ivey.

Have you ever heard of Birmingham artist Celestia Anne (Cookie) Morgan? I hadn’t until a friend insisted that I check out her “REDLINE” exhibit at the Birmingham Museum of Art. And I certainly knew nothing about the practice of redlining. Continue reading Discrimination exposed by brilliant Birmingham black artist